Sunday, February 12, 2017

The History of Digital Marketing


With the advent of Gutenberg’s printing press in Europe in 1450, the ability to mass-communicate and sell gained such epic momentum that it’s barely slowed down in over 500 years. Magazines first emerged in the 1730s, radio advertising in 1922 and then in 1941, the world’s first TV ad was broadcast on American screens in one of the most groundbreaking moments in marketing history.

In 1965, a computer in Massachusetts connected with another in California via dial-up and in 1973 the first hand-held mobile phone call was made. But it wasn’t until the early 1980s when the first commercially available desktop PCs started filtering into homes, that a tidal wave of new marketing possibilities crashed onto the scene with digital. That was around 34 years ago.


By the time Digital Marketing had gone mainstream,
  1. Queen Elizabeth had already sent her first royal email
  2. PhotoShop 6.0 had been released
  3. Ridley Scott had long since directed and screened the first ever Apple Mac ad
  4. The first major spamming incidents by marketers had come and gone
  5. The World Wide Web was already 15-years old
  6. Everyone was talking about a thing called Facebook
  7. Businesses were already using AdWords to generate traffic
  8. SEO was a major buzzword
Early search engines like Yahoo!, InfoSeek, AltaVista, Lycos and WebCrawler made significant strides in the digital evolution of search but let’s be honest, the golden years didn’t start until Google launched in 1998. With the birth of today’s most popular search engine and its development of tools like AdWords in 2000 and content targeting services in 2003, everything changed online. In 2004, search engines started using advanced ranking algorithms and browsing online became more personal. The impact this had on business is immense. Being able to target browsers and develop strategies based on search patterns led to a whole new way of selling and communicating. These days a Googlebot crawls and indexes trillions of pages on the web and makes the most relevant ones instantly accessible via traditional or voice search. A brand can reach anyone, anywhere at any time, and that’s powerful.
Optimizing sites for search engines began to mainstream in the mid-90s and by 2004, SEO had become an essential marketing tool used on a global scale. In the early days, techniques like keyword stuffing, article submissions and link spamming were recommended by guys who mostly just didn’t know better. No one cared about the impact of social media and usability didn’t even come up in conversation – SEO was an island and keywords were embarrassing. But you learn.

These days SEO is less of a loner and more of an essential cog in a greater machine powered by other strategies and channels.
In 2004 people still used MySpace. Little did anyone know at the time that Mark Zuckerberg and his Harvard roommates would release a colossal giant to crush all that came before. It was the start of a new era for digital marketing. Social media stopped being a way to just chat with friends and started becoming a way to connect with brands, complain, spread news, shop and even influence other shoppers. Businesses took notice and online reputation management became more important than ever. Today, with channels like Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and Pinterest, with billions of users, targeted advertising and a digital landscape that never sleeps, social media has become one of the most vital parts of any marketing strategy.

And now for some Digital Marketing Facts :
  • 80% of consumers say they do “a lot of” online research before making significant purchase decisions. 
  • 46% of online users count on social media when making a purchase decision.
  • 38% of companies will hire more digital marketing professionals in the coming year. But about half of those positions will be filled by temporary or contract help, not full-time employees. 
  • More than a third of CMOs say that digital marketing will account for 75% or more of their spending within the next five years.
  • 60% of all digital advertising goes toward direct response goals.
  • Less than one-third of customer service interactions took place online last year (social media, chat or email), but that volume is expected grow 53% in the coming year.
  • Companies spent, on average, 10% of total revenue on marketing in 2014. 25% of total budgets were spent on digital marketing, with 51% of companies planning larger budgets for 2015.
  • Roughly half of all employed online adults also said digital media has changed the way they work, including the number of people they have contact with (51% of respondents) and the number of hours they work (35%).
When asked to name their number-one challenge, 15% of digital marketers said “meeting the expectations of the always-connected customer,” 14% chose “executing consistent campaigns that drive desired business outcomes” (i.e., leads or revenue) and 13% cited the proliferation of channels across paid, owned and earned media.

Special thanks to :
tooheywebdesign.com
business2community.com
mediavisioninteractive.com

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